Psychology, BS or not? (read this)

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Subject: Psychology, BS or not? (read this)
Psychology is that branch of science which focuses on the behaviour of human beings and animals, with particular emphasis on the individual rather than the group. Courses in our department span the various fields of psychology and introduce students to the methods used in psychological research. The basic tools of the research psychologist include experimentation in the laboratory and field, naturalistic observation, and the use of statistical methods in interpreting data.

Our faculty have highly diversified interests which are reflected in the number and variety of our undergraduate course offerings. These include courses in developmental psychology, social psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, animal behaviour, learning, cognitive psychology, perception, and physiological psychology. Students in psychology learn how psychologists have increased our general understanding of the nature of behaviour and how practical problems have led psychologists to pose questions for research that have yielded solutions to them.

To become a professional psychologist normally requires that one obtain a Ph.D. degree, which involves three to five years of graduate study in addition to four years of undergraduate study. Those with a PhD in psychology find employment in universities and other educational settings, research institutes, large corporations, hospitals and clinics, and government and social service agencies. To a large extent, one´s initial employment depends upon the specific orientation of one´s graduate work.

Among the various fields one can pursue at the graduate level are Experimental Psychology, which prepares students for careers in teaching and research; Clinical Psychology, which trains students in the assessment and therapeutic treatment of persons suffering emotional maladaptive problems; School Psychology, which is concerned with educational effectiveness and psychological testing; Counselling Psychology, which deals with helping individuals cope with the problems associated with everyday living (e.g., career planning and problems dealing with interpersonal relationships such as marriage); Industrial Psychology, which involves the application of psychology to the business, industrial, and engineering environments. You should note that any given university does not necessarily offer graduate programs in all these areas.

The B.Sc., with a concentration in psychology, does not itself provide a professional qualification. The B.Sc. graduate must expect on-the-job training, graduate study, or both. Students who have concentrated in psychology in their undergraduate program do find employment in business, technical and educational areas, and they may also assume paraprofessional roles in the social service and mental health areas. Among the positions students with a B.Sc. degree have attained are those of research technician in a university, research institute, business, or industry (particularly when combined with laboratory experience and computer skills); placement or personnel officer; student counsellor; and probation officer.

Many programs and schools at the University of Toronto that are available to students who have completed their undergraduate degrees require or strongly recommend that students have included certain psychology courses in their undergraduate programs. Such programs and schools include Social Work, Criminology, Medicine, Institute of Child Study, Speech Pathology, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Special Education, and Guidance Options at the Faculty of Education and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Undergraduate courses in psychology may also be of value to students planning various professional careers such as engineering, law, nursing, and physical and health education.

[11-08-2006,09:55]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
psychology is pretty much a science nowaday.

those universities that still learn "artsy" psychology such as predicting how people behaviour from "philosophy" perspective are offering a shitty education.

a new branch of psychology should study neuroscience, stats, experiments, and the scientific method, and university that offers these are more likely to have more sucessful graduates.

btw, i´m not a psycho student. just stating that since there´s many anti-psycho people here on board, and wanna make myself clear, i´m neutral.

[11-08-2006,10:18]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
^ wow, you dont know anying
[11-08-2006,19:03]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
No universities learn your so called "artsy" psychology, they all learn the same damn thing. They learn some arts type material, and some science material. All psychology programs study neuroscience and stats, and what the fuck do you mean by "experiments, and the scientific method"????? yes.. so schools should teach generic scientific methods? and experiments? sweet that sounds promising. If you dont know anything about anything then just dont type.
[11-08-2006,19:29]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
there is no such thing as a profession psychologist you idiot! we have psychiatrists, which are 100x better prepared for professional practice and actually hold a professional licence.

[11-08-2006,19:33]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
You guys sound like a bunch of 6 year olds.
[11-08-2006,21:19]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
WHAT ARE TRAINING AND CREDENTIALS PSYCHOLOGISTS NEED TO PRACTICE PSYCHOLOGY?

To practice psychology in Canada, one must be licensed. Alternate terms for licensure are registered and chartered. When considering the services of any professional, it is always wise to seek the services of someone who is licensed. Licensure helps to protect the public by ensuring that the professional has met, and is accountable to, rigorous standards of practice.

In Canada, psychologists, like other health care professionals, are licensed to practice by regulatory bodies in each Canadian jurisdiction. A listing of all the Canadian regulatory bodies of psychology can be accessed from our webpage http://www.cpa.ca/inprovinces.html.

The requirements for licensure vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In some jurisdictions, the doctorate degree is required for registration and in others it is the master?s degree. Psychologists with a doctoral degree can use the title ?Dr. ? A listing of all the provincial and territorial regulatory requirements, can be found on our website at http://www.cpa.ca/licensing.html.

For psychologists already registered in one Canadian jurisdiction wanting to practice in another jurisdiction, their mobility might be facilitated by the Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA). The MRA and its provisions is also available from our website http://www.cpa.ca/MRA.pdf.

For those trained in psychology outside of Canada, and who want to move to a Canadian jurisdiction to practice psychology, they should contact the regulatory body in the jurisdiction in which they want to practice to determine if they have the necessary qualifications for registration. http://www.cpa.ca/inprovinces.html and http://www.cpa.ca/licensing.html.

For those wanting to study psychology outside of Canada, and then return to work as a psychologist in Canada, they should also contact the regulatory body in the jurisdiction to which they are likely to return, to ensure that the foreign studies they are planning to undertake would give them the necessary credentials for registration to practice psychology in Canada. http://www.cpa.ca/inprovinces.html and http://www.cpa.ca/licensing.html.


[11-08-2006,22:13]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Psychology, BS or not? (read this))
It´s really sad how ignorant people are. Some of you people don´t realize how important psychology is to society, nor the complexity of the human mind.
[12-08-2006,00:03]
Anonymous



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